Research + News | Topic: Digital Citizenship

Former iPod/iPhone Creator: “I Wake Up In Cold Sweats Thinking, What Did We Bring To The World?”

Tony Fadell, one of the minds behind the iPod and the iPhone, mulls design’s unintended consequences. Read the article here.

Talk To Your Teenager About Digital Literacy

Many young people have not yet fully grasped that what they share online can derail their future. Read the article here.

Forming Family Values In A Digital Age

Forces like technology are influencing habits in the home and disrupting traditional norms that have shaped young people for generations. But some things never change—like the parental responsibility for setting and communicating the values of their home and family.

Read this research from Barna and take a look at the book from Andy Crouch The Tech-Wise Family: Everyday Steps for Putting Technology in Its Proper Place here.

What Is “Brain Hacking”? Tech Insider On Why You Should Care

Silicon Valley is engineering your phone, apps and social media to get you hooked, says a former Google product manager. Read the article and watch the report from Anderson Cooper here.

Some Teens Would Rather FaceTime Than See Friends In Person

Nearly one in five teens surveyed preferred video chat via platforms like FaceTime or Skype over face-to-face hangout sessions. Read the research here.

The Secret Online World of British Teens: How Streaks, Deep Likes And Ghosting Define Young Lives

Britain’s teenagers are growing up in a new online world, rife with anxiety-inducing social pressures, bullying, and security issues. What’s it like to grow up online?

Read the article from WIRED here.

Resources For Parents Wanting to Break Kids’ Extreme Electronics Usage Habits

How excessive use of technology can impact brain function. Find a list of resources here.

6 Tech Habits Changing The American Home

Parents today believe it is harder than ever to raise children. The number-one reason? Technology.

Read this article and research update from Barna here.

Online Risks Are Everyday Events For Teens – But They Rarely Tell Their Parents

“According to one study, teens and young adults ages 16 to 24 spend almost 200 minutes a day (3 hours, 20 minutes) online on a mobile device. With that much time spent online, they’re bound to frequently encounter risks or unpleasant experiences, whether intentionally or not. But the more parents freak out about these incidents, the less likely their teens are to tell them about it next time.”

Read the rest of the article from Forbes here.

Kids Entering the Digital Age At Young Ages

Many kids are entering the digital age before they are entering double digits in age.

Read the article here.